Year 2015 365 Photo Journey (Jan. 8th and 11th)

Apparently, this is a thing. Consider it a challenge, a journal, or a journey (I prefer journey). Take a picture a day and post it to your blog. Here are some reasons why you should try it, too.

Well, I forgot to take pictures on Thursday and Friday. However, I snapped quite a few good pictures over the weekend. So much so, that I have two pictures for each of the last four days. Enjoy!

January 8th. Smoochie is looking at me.
January 8th. Smoochie is looking at me.
January 8th. Smoochie is looking at me.
January 8th. Smoochie is looking at me.
January 9th. Three angels.
January 9th. Three angels.
January 9th. Hindu Goddess.
January 9th. Hindu Goddess.
January 10th. Mouser is not amused.
January 10th. Mouser is not amused.
January 10th. Mouser is a sweet kitty (sometimes).
January 10th. Mouser is a sweet kitty (sometimes).
January 11th. Darth Vader.
January 11th. Darth Vader.
January 11th. Help us aFord school.
January 11th. Help us aFord school.

Year 2015 365 Photo Journey (Jan. 6th and 7th)

Apparently, this is a thing. Consider it a challenge, a journal, or a journey (I prefer journey). Take a picture a day and post it to your blog. Here are some reasons why you should try it, too.

I feel these pictures came out a bit better than the last batch.

January 6th. About to drive home from work. It had just snowed. And it was very cold.
January 6th. About to drive home from work. It had just snowed. And it was very cold.

 

January 7. Breakroom floor. And my shoe. The footprint is not mine.
January 7. Breakroom floor. And my shoe. The footprint is not mine.

New Year 365 Photo Journey (Jan. 4 and 5)

Apparently, this is a thing. Consider it a challenge, a journal, or a journey (I prefer journey). Take a picture a day and post it to your blog. Here are some reasons why you should try it, too.

My journey continues. I struggled a bit these two days to find good photographs. But the creative process is not always easy.

January 4th. Hung the Buddha.
January 4th. Hung the Buddha.
January 5th. At the office.
January 5th. At the office.

New Year 365 Photo Journey

Apparently, this is a thing. Consider it a challenge, a journal, or a journey (I prefer journey). Take a picture a day and post it to your blog. I’m going to try it … with a caveat. It will be OK to take two or more pictures in a day to “catch up,” as it were, if I had forgotten to take them on the previous days. A year is a long time, and I know it will happen. Here are some reasons why you should try it, too.

Jan 1 365 Photo Challenge
January 1st. At the Indianapolis Art Museum.
Jan 2 365 Photo Challenge
January 2nd. At the Indianapolis Art Museum.
Jan 3 365 Photo Challenge
January 3rd. At Perkins, late at night.

Jane Eyre Vocab & Quotes: Installment Six

This is the sixth installment of my longstanding series Jane Eyre Vocabulary & Quotes. So without further ado, let us begin!

pecuniary: Of, relating to, or consisting of money.

My pecuniary affairs suffer much because of my addiction to video games.

lineaments: An outline, feature, or contour of a body or figure and especially of a face—usually used in plural. A linear topographic feature (as of the earth) that reveals a characteristic (as a fault or the subsurface structure).

The bus driver’s lineaments revealed a hard life.

dandle: To move (a baby or young child) up and down in a playful or affectionate way.

My inexpert dandling of the newly born child caused the midwife much uneasiness.

aerie [British eyrie, as written in Jane Eyre]: The nest of a bird (such as an eagle or hawk) built high up on a cliff or on the top of a mountain. A room or building built high up so that people inside can see things happening below them.

The boy balanced himself atop the flagpole and gazed down triumphantly on the playground below, as an eagle in its aerie may upon a vast forest.

Well, that’s all for now. Feel free to comment on this post with your own sentences from the words above. I’ll leave you with a quote from Jane Eyre:

“Presentiments are strange things! and so are sympathies; and so are signs: and the three combined make one mystery to which humanity has not yet found the key. I never laughed at presentiments in my life; because I have had strange ones of my own. Sympathies, I believe, exist: ( for instance, between far-distant, long-absent, wholly estranged relatives asserting, notwithstanding their alienation, the unity of the source to which each traces his origin) whose workings baffle mortal comprehension. And signs, for aught we know, may be but the sympathies of Nature with man.”

Word of the Day: Nudnik

The Word of the Day today is nudnik. I discovered this word while reading Phillip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle. I quote:

But above and beyond everything else, he had originally been drawn by her screwball expression; for no reason, Juliana greeted strangers with a portentous, nudnik, Mona Lisa smile that hung them up between responses, whether to say hello or not.

Dick uses the word as an adjective, although it appears to be a noun. That is neither here nor there.

The Man in the High Castle
The Man in the High Castle

According to Merriam-Webster, nudnik means “a person who is a bore or nuisance.”

I might use the word nudnik in a sentence like this:

A group of brainy nudniks beat my friends and I head-to-head on trivia night at Books and Brews, a local bar and restaurant.

Baron Samedi

Baron Samedi figures in the Haitian Voodoo religion. He is often depicted as having a skull-like face (or an actual skull for a head). He usually wears a top hat, dark glasses, and a black tuxedo. He may have plugs of cotton in his nostrils in imitation of a recently deceased person prepared for burial in the Haitian tradition. He is usually seen smoking a cigar and drinking from a glass full of rum. He is boisterous and depraved, fond of obscene language, yet provocative and charming.

Baron Samedi Alter

Baron Samedi is a Loa of the Voodoo religion. Loa are intermediaries between humanity and the great Voodoo god and Supreme Creator Bondye. Baron Samedi is the Loa of resurrection, and he is responsible for digging the graves of the recently departed and leading their souls to the underworld. As such, he also has the power to heal the sick.

Live and Let Die

I learned about Baron Samedi while reading the second James Bond novel, Live and Let Die, by Ian Fleming. In it, Mr. Big subjugates his minions by convincing them that he is a zombie controlled by Baron Samedi, played by Geoffrey Holder. It should be noted that the movie is a very loose adaptation of the novel. The movie wasn’t really very good. Do yourself a favor and read the novel! It’s an excellent read!

A quote from Live and Let Die:

“You start to die the moment you are born. The whole of life is cutting through the pack with death. So take it easy. Light a cigarette and be grateful you are still alive as you suck the smoke deep into your lungs. Your stars have already let you come quite a long way since you left your mother’s womb and whimpered at the cold air of the world.”

Quote From Of Mice and Men

I recently read Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. I rather enjoyed this short novel about two farm hands—Lennie, a huge overgrown bear of a man with the brain of a child, and George, his life-smart friend and caretaker—out to make a living on the farms of California during the Great Depression.

From Of Mice and Men:

Curley’s wife lay with a half-covering of yellow hay. And the meanness and the plannings and the discontent and the ache for attention were all gone from her face. She was pretty and simple, and her face was sweet and young. Now her rouged cheeks and her reddened lips made her seem alive and sleeping very lightly. The curls, tiny little sausages, were spread on the hay behind her head, and her lips were parted.

As happens sometimes, a moment settled and hovered and remained for much more than a moment. And sound stopped and movement stopped for much, much more than a moment.

Then gradually time awakened again and moved sluggishly on. The horses stamped on the other side of the feeding racks and the halter chains clinked. Outside, the men’s voices became louder and clearer.

At any rate, the preceding passage caught me. I think we’ve all experienced moments like these when time seems to slow to a stop. And then after a moment in eternity passes, the machinery of life seems to start back up again.

Interestingly, Steinbeck creates this moment when there is no living person in the scene. The POV is omniscient. It’s almost as if he’s directing a scene for a movie.

Jane Eyre Vocab & Quotes: Installment Five

This is the fifth installment of my longstanding series Jane Eyre Vocabulary & Quotes. So without further ado, let us begin!

halcyon: Of or relating to the halcyon (a bird identified with the kingfisher and held in ancient legend to nest at sea about the time of the winter solstice and to calm the waves during incubation) or its nesting period. Calm, peaceful, happy, golden.

I remember the halcyon days of my youth, when life was replete with love and romance.

appanage: A grant (as of land or revenue) made by a sovereign or a legislative body to a dependent member of the royal family or a principal vassal. A rightful endowment or adjunct.

The dilapidated tree-house was my sole appanage.

fillip: A blow or gesture made by the sudden forcible straightening of a finger curled up against the thumb. To strike or tap with a fillip.

Charley filliped his younger sister, Mary, which caused her to cry out and beseech her parents for redress.

lachrymose: Tending to cause tears. Tending to cry often.

Of late, Daniel was lachrymose, perhaps because of the sudden and unforeseen demise of his pet gerbil, Ivan.

incubus: An evil spirit that lies on persons in their sleep, especially one that has sexual intercourse with women while they are sleeping. One that oppresses or burdens like a nightmare.

Elizabeth accused Bartholomew of being an incubus, which caused him to smile wryly and lick his lips.

Well, that’s all for now. Feel free to comment on this post with your own sentences from the words above. I’ll leave you with a quote from Jane Eyre:

“… Do you never laugh, Miss Eyre? Don’t trouble yourself to answer—I see, you laugh rarely; but you can laugh very merrily: believe me, you are not naturally austere, any more than I am naturally vicious. The Lowood constraint still clings to you somewhat; controlling your features, muffling your voice, and restricting your limbs; and you fear in the presence of a man and a brother—or father, or master, or what you will—to smile too gaily, speak too freely, or move too quickly: but, in time, I think you will learn to be natural with me, as I find it impossible to be conventional with you; and then your looks and movements will have more vivacity and variety than they dare offer now.”

Jane Eyre Vocab & Quotes: Installment Four

This is the fourth installment of my longstanding series Jane Eyre Vocabulary & Quotes. So without further ado, let us begin!

lugubrious: Full of sadness or sorrow, especially in an exaggerated or insincere way.

Mr. Underwood lugubriously recounted the passing of his pet Guinea Pig, Fluffums.

etiolate: To bleach and alter the natural development of (a green plant) by excluding sunlight. To make pale.

She stood motionless, like a marble statue, her etiolated limbs drained of blood despite the furious pumping of her heart, as the Tarantula inched its way across her foot.

habergeon: A medieval jacket of mail shorter than a hauberk.

Todd donned the Habergeon of Virginal Perpetuity before embarking upon his quest to claim the Throne of Nerdia.

subjoin: Annex or append.

Subjoining caramel frosting to the chocolate cakes was the confectioner’s secret.

welkin: The vault of the sky (firmament). The celestial abode of God or the gods.

Herman walked alone and desolated under the city’s foreboding welkin of clouded chrome.

Well, that’s all for now. Feel free to comment on this post with your own sentences from the words above. I’ll leave you with a quote from Jane Eyre:

Know, that in the course of your future life you will often find yourself elected the involuntary confidant of your acquaintances’ secrets: people will instinctively find out, as I have done, that it is not your forte to tell of yourself, but to listen while others talk of themselves; they will feel, too, that you listen with no malevolent scorn of their indiscretion, but with a kind of innate sympathy; not the less comforting and encouraging because it is very unobtrusive in its manifestations.

Me: This passage reminds me very much of the beginning of The Great Gatsby when Fitzgerald made Nick ruminate thusly: “…I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran bores. The abnormal mind is quick to detect and attach itself to this quality when it appears in a normal person, and so it came about that in college I was unjustly accused of being a politician, because I was privy to the secret griefs of wild, unknown men. Most of the confidences were unsought — frequently I have feigned sleep, preoccupation, or a hostile levity when I realized by some unmistakable sign that an intimate revelation was quivering on the horizon; for the intimate revelations of young men, or at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope.”